Moving the smart cities conversation forward
 
 
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Anil Menon, Keynote Speaker at the 2017 Smart Regions Conference presented by Venture Smarter

Anil Menon

(Global President, Cisco Smart+ Connected Communities) emphasized the importance of looking at smart city growth through a regional lens as the Keynote Speaker at the 2017 Smart Regions Conference presented by Venture Smarter. The event welcomed 700+ guests, 1000's of live stream viewers, and 2,000,000+ impressions (and counting!)

View "Smart Regions Conference Event Recap"

Karen Jackson, Secretary of Technology at the Commonwealth of Virginia

Karen Jackson, Secretary of Technology at the Commonwealth of Virginia

Tom Lampe, Commissioner at Campbell County

Tom Lampe, Commissioner at Campbell County

Tom Synan, Chief of Police at the Village of Newtown and Hamilton County Heroin Coalition Leader

Tom Synan, Chief of Police at the Village of Newtown and Hamilton County Heroin Coalition Leader

Zack Huhn, Chief Executive Officer at Venture Smarter and Chair of the IEEE Smart Cities Standards Subcommittee

Zack Huhn, Chief Executive Officer at Venture Smarter and Chair of the IEEE Smart Cities Standards Subcommittee

 
 

RSCI ANNUAL REPORT: OCT '16 - Nov '17

Beyond Municipal Limits

Building a model for smart regional growth

Connectivity, Mobility, Security, Sustainability

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, RSCI: RHONDA BINDA
INTERIM DIRECTOR, SMART CINCY: MATT KOESTERS
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD, RSCI: ZACK HUHN

 
 

The Regional Smart Cities Initiative grew significantly in reach and impact over the last twelve months, and officially launched efforts in the Midwest as Greater Cincinnati served as the first region for pilot projects where leaders aligned around strategies looking beyond municipal boundaries. Those efforts culminated in several public private partnerships, municipal procurements and action steps, and the foundation of regional smart city development. The annual report will reference success stories, challenges, and realizations from the working group efforts in Cincinnati, although RSCI is moving forward on active projects around the world. The Smart Cincy working group covers the Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana tri-state region where efforts are rooted in building collaboration communities to assess and understand available resources and addressable opportunity areas looking through the lens of smart and connected technologies. It is from here that efforts are being modeled and iterated to best address local and regional needs. Already, leaders throughout each of the three initial states are moving to make RSCI statewide. The model is being surveyed at the federal level, and across national borders.

Smart Cincy Logo Smart Cities Cincinnati

In its first year, Smart Cincy hosted twelve monthly round tables diving into topic areas including connected infrastructure, project financing, autonomous transportation, environment and sustainability, public safety and security, and dynamic public transit. Quarterly leadership summits catalyze technology and policy opportunities and collaborations, and the annual conference serves to showcase the technologies, strategies, and leaders building smart and connected communities worldwide. In additional the the Smart Cincy Summit in April, RSCI hosted summits in New York City in May and in Washington DC in June at The World Bank to begin replicating community engagement efforts domestically and abroad. At the Smart Cincy Summit the City of Cincinnati released a downtown WiFi RFQ. 6 months later at the Smart Regions Conference at BB&T Arena across the river in Northern Kentucky, the City of Cincinnati released an RFP for a regional smart mobility app in collaboration with the Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Council of Governments and each of the regional transit authorities. Eventually, smart and connected corridor projects will enable dynamic public transit and autonomous transportation. Already in the region, a bike share program stretches across municipal and state lines and acts as an economic development driver for other smart city projects. Moreover, the University of Cincinnati is collaborating with RSCI leadership to launch smart transportation research projects including a Cincinnati to Columbus connectivity corridor project that would include Hyperloop and autonomous transportation considerations. (More on that, soon.)

In each active region, leadership committees have been established across four key theme areas: connectivity, mobility, security, and sustainability. Each committee has subcommittees that are tasked with project research and development supporting established and emerging Smart City Development Goals. RSCI has engaged elected and public officials at local, county, state, regional, and federal levels resulting in dozens of active projects and hundreds of government collaborations and partnerships. Universities and research institutions, industry, and NGO partners have been monumental in co-creating a cohesive and collaborative framework that will be made available to the public for free access in 2018. This framework is best utilized in cooperation with the IEEE Smart Cities Technology Standards and Process Planning Framework (P2784.)


COMMUNITY - Establishing Working Groups and Coalitions

Engaging each stakeholder is required to break down silos and streamline smart city success stories that put people first. Creating collaboration communities is the step ahead of aligning around smart city development goals and action steps.
 

Problem: knowledge and resource silos, missed opportunities, squandered resources, redundant efforts, frustrating project efforts
Goal: streamline smart city conversations, resources, and efforts

(More Details Below)


CONNECTIVITY - Collaborating to create an interoperable layer of smart city connectivity

Creating a foundational layer of connectivity and access is what will allow smart city solutions to have impact and scale. We must connect our people, places, things, and information with interoperable and secure solutions, and in doing so we will defeat the digital divide for our residents and businesses regardless of socioeconomic, physical, or geographical barriers. By adding a connectivity prioritization to our infrastructure projects we can begin connecting our places, people, and things seamlessly. This layer includes broadband and WiFi, cellular, and IoT network solutions.

Problem: 16-22% digital divide across Greater Cincinnati
Goal: 100% Connected Citizens by 2021 

(More Details Below)


MOBILITY - Creating equitable and accessible transit and transportation systems and strategies

Smart and connected technologies can make equitable access to mobility and transit a reality, enhancing social mobility and driving economic development in our cities and regions by connecting people to education, jobs, healthcare, and opportunities. While immediate mobility solutions will relieve congestion and benefit environmental outcomes, longterm efforts will enable advanced and autonomous mobility solutions to drive forward the next paradigm shift in transportation.

Problem: 74,000 open jobs are not accessible via public transit, yet homelessness and unemployment is rampant
Goal: 100% Mobility Access for Citizens by 2021

(More Details Below)


RESILIENCE (SECURITY AND SUSTAINABILITY) - Addressing threats and vulnerabilities head-on leveraging smart planning and technology

Resilience means we address our most urgent problems head-on and get predictive about risk and threat mitigation including in cybersecurity, defeating the digital divide, environmental and economic sustainability, and even fighting the heroin and opioid epidemic that is crippling our towns

Problem: Existing and emerging threats continue to bottleneck public resources
Goal: Get ahead of threats with big data, predictive analytics, and open and secure data exchanges

(More Details Below)


KEY COLLABORATORS - Collaboration across sectors drives smart city success stories

Leaders across sectors are supporting and actively participating in Regional Smart Cities Initiatives, including in government, academia, business, and NGO's. In Greater Cincinnati, for example, each major university, the regional council of governments, local, county and state government agencies, startups and enterprise businesses, and community groups are working together to streamline efforts and align around smart city development goals.

Leadership: Rhonda Binda (Executive Director, RSCI) Matt Koesters (Interim Director, Smart Cincy,) Jamie Sordo (Director of Marketing)
Advisory Board: Zack Huhn, Wendy Lea, Pat Limbach, Rahul Bawa, Casey Barach, Jill Henry, Jon Salisbury, Melinda Kruyer

 
Follow @VentureSmarter #SmartRegions - Special thanks to our sponsors and friends for making the nation's first #SmartRegions Conference a success!

Follow @VentureSmarter #SmartRegions - Special thanks to our sponsors and friends for making the nation's first #SmartRegions Conference a success!

100% Inclusive

 

Building collaboration communities 

 
 

Smart City Solutions must reach beyond municipal boundaries, and planning conversations cannot happen in silos. The Regional Smart Cities Initiative launched in 2016 to bring together community, government, academic, and business leaders to understand available resources and addressable opportunity areas looking through the smart and connected lens. 

Regional Smart Cities Initiatives are designed to help leaders across sectors stand up smart city projects and success stories by providing a framework, teaming ecosystem, and community engagement platform to bring cohesiveness and structure to smart and connected planning efforts.

Venture Smarter's Regional Smart Cities Initaitives engage community and business leaders, academic and research institutions, and government leaders at local, county, state, and federal levels to break down the barriers to smart city success stories by aligning interests around policy, technology, and financing models that support social mobility and economic development - and ultimately create better places to live, work, and visit.

FEATURED REGIONAL PROJECT:

SMART CINCY

  • Regional leadership committees
  • University and government partnerships developing Smart City programming
  • PPP leading smart and connected pilot projects focused on connectivity, mobility, and resilience.
  • Coming soon: fund for project support and grant matching
  • GOAL: 100% Connected, 100% Mobile Citizens by 2021!
 

41

active projects

96

government partners

 

3,429

engaged Supporters

 

1,409

Active pARTICIPANTS

 
 

100% Connected

People, Places, Things, and Information (Data)

 

"Connectivity is the foundational layer upon which smart city solutions will scale..."

 
 

Creating a foundational layer of connectivity and access is what will allow smart city solutions to have impact and scale. This layer includes broadband and WiFi, cellular, and IoT network solutions. We must connect our people, places, things, and information with interoperable and secure solutions, and in doing so we will defeat the digital divide for our residents and businesses regardless of socioeconomic, physical, or geographical barriers. By adding a connectivity prioritization to our infrastructure projects we can begin connecting our places, people, and things seamlessly

Problem: 16-22% digital divide across Greater Cincinnati
Goal: 100% Connected Citizens by 2021 

 

 

Although it’s just a start - these goals are timely in addressing regional pain points… We can’t ignore the 16-22% digital divide in our region, depending on the neighborhood. We believe smart city solutions can create 100% connected citizens by 2021, and many of our partners and collaborators have a jump on that effort with free and reduced cost connectivity services and community engagement applications.

 

THINGS WE ARE FOCUSED ON:

  • DIGITAL DIVIDE
  • PLANNING FRAMEWORK
  • SMART CINCY RFQ
  • PRIORITIZATIONS

 

 
100% Connected - Smart City Development Goal

Busayo Odunlami, Venture Smarter

 
 

100% Mobile

Moving People, Goods, and Utilities

 

"Smart Mobility solutions will provide residents equitable access to jobs, education, healthcare, and opportunities beyond municipal limits..."

 
 
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Dr Gjoko Muratovski, University of Cincinnati

Smart and connected technologies can make equitable access to mobility and transit solution a reality, enhancing social mobility and driving economic development in our cities and regions by connecting people to education, jobs, healthcare, and opportunities. While immediate mobility solutions will relieve congestion and benefit environmental outcomes, longterm efforts will enable advanced and autonomous mobility solutions to drive forward the next paradigm shift in transportation.

Problem: 74,000 open jobs are not accessible via public transit, yet homelessness and unemployment is rampant
Goal: 100% Mobility Access for Citizens by 2021

 

74,000 jobs in Cincinnati are not accessible via public transportation. And at the same time, poverty and homelessness is crippling our neighborhoods. By connecting people to equitable mobility solutions, we can connect them to jobs, education, healthcare, and opportunities. We believe that smart city solutions can provide 100% mobility access to residents by 2021.

The city’s regional mobility app is one step towards creating a more mobile region where people have the ability to get to work, school, and healthcare without roadblocks or barriers. This effort is timely as the University of Cincinnati is working with RSCI leadership to establish a smart and connected mobility corridor that focuses on multi-modal solutions stretching beyond municipal limits.

THINGS WE ARE FOCUSED ON:

  • TRANSPORTATION / TRANSIT
  • MULTI MODAL
  • TRANSPORTATION CENTER
  • CONNECTIVITY CORRIDOR
  • HYPERLOOP RESEARCH
  • PUBLIC TRANSIT DATA & EFFORTS
  • OKI MSA AWARD
  • SMART MOBILITY RFP
 
 

Always Resilient

Resilience means we address our most urgent problems head-on and get predictive about risk and threat mitigation including in cybersecurity, defeating the digital divide, environmental and economic sustainability, and even fighting the heroin and opioid epidemic that is crippling our towns

THINGS WE ARE FOCUSED ON:

  • Public Safety
  • Cyber Security
  • Personal Privacy
  • Economic Growth
  • Environmental Sustainability
  • Infrastructure Resiliency
  • Social and Cultural Engagement

In Conclusion

It means that our elderly, disabled, and at need residents can tap smart and connected technologies to realize a better quality of life...
— Zack Huhn

Putting people first means even those without financial means can access smart city solutions.  It means that our elderly, disabled, and at need residents and visitors can tap smart and connected technologies to realize a better quality of life regardless of socioeconomic, geographical, or physical barriers. It means we use technology as a tool to create better places to live, work, and visit by creating a community around future visions and identified needs.  These efforts require a regional approach. They require collaboration across sectors and must not be forged in silos, but by tapping interdisciplinary stakeholders so we can achieve outcomes from defeating the digital divide to automating transportation - and a lot more in between. 

The Regional Smart Cities Initiative launched with the goal of establishing collaboration communities to create a model for smart regional growth that will empower our small and medium size communities to pursue and realize smart city success stories in urban, suburban, and rural areas, alike. Greater Cincinnati continues to grow efforts, and remains the central hub of RSCI as statewide and regional expansion efforts in Ohio, Kentucky, and Indiana continue to develop. Outside of the Midwest, leaders in dozens of states and countries have begun community building around RSCI goals and resources. As RSCI grows, so will its impact. 100% Connected, 100% Mobile is not a goal set that is limited by borders or boundaries. This vision and mission starts locally, and grows globally. It requires all hands on deck as we work together to build smart and connected communities leveraging technology and IoT to create better places to live, work, and visit. Interested in learning more or getting involved? Let's chat! (e) hello@smartregions.org or get in touch with a team member.

Executive Director, RSCI: Rhonda Binda
Chairman of the Board, RSCI: Zack Huhn
Interim Director, Smart Cincy: Matt Koesters
 

 
 

Create or Join A Smart Regions Working Group!

 
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